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Living a Values-Driven Life at Home and Work – Episode Two (II)

newseriesrbmo042415Long-term series Episode II April 24, 2015

Living Values-Driven Lives at Home and Work

Featuring Richard Barrett, Maureen Watson UK Values Alliance and Danae Johnson Co-Author of The World Book of Values. A further evolution in the continuing broadcasting series, by sharing the public stage with people from all walks of life in establishing values through the metrics of consciousness.

Evolving broadcast dialogues created for home and work. Designed for the discovery and sharing of emerging values, stages of psychological development and levels of consciousness.

Taken from research developed over the last twenty years by Richard Barrett and practised by the Barrett Values Centre throughout the world.

Expanding dialogues with participation from people anywhere in the world – at or home or work

Guided by Richard Barrett FRSA with Broadcaster & Historian David William Gibbons

 

Richard Barrett is an author, speaker and internationally recognised thought leader on the evolution of human values in business and society. He is the founder and chairman of the Barrett Values Centre, a Fellow of the World Business Academy, Member of the Wisdom Council of the Centre for Integral Wisdom, Honorary Board Member of the Spirit of Humanity Forum, and Former Values Coordinator at the World Bank. Richard has been a visiting lecturer at the Consulting and Coaching for Change, Leadership Course run by the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford and HEC in Paris. He has also been an Adjunct Professor at Royal Roads University, Institute for Values-based Leadership, and a visiting lecturer at the One Planet MBA at Exeter University.

From 2007, up to the present, Richard has spearheaded the Barrett Values Centre’s work in mapping the values of over twenty nations. These include: Australia, Belgium, Bhutan, Canada, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Nigeria, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Trinidad, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and the United States. Richard has been a visiting lecturer at the Consulting and Coaching for Change, leadership course run by the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford and HEC in Paris. He has also been an Adjunct Professor at Royal Roads University, Institute for Values-based Leadership, and a visiting lecturer at the One Planet MBA at Exeter University.

 

Maureen Watson

Maureen is the co-founder of the UK Values Alliance whose vision is to put values at the heart of society. Its formation in January 2013 followed the results from the the 2012 BVC UK National Values Assessment that showed a large disparity between the Personal values of people in the UK and those they saw in the UK culture. She believes awareness helps us make conscious changes in our lives, for example to live and work based on our values. She sees developing awareness as key to giving us these choices and, being so fundamental, chose this as her contribution to ‘A World Book of Values’. Underlying developing awareness is,
for Maureen, meditation. Being introduced to this practice and making it a regular part of her life led to her career change from industrial chemist to financial services advisor and then to her becoming a personal and business development consultant, incorporating the teaching of Kundalini yoga and mediation.

Danae Johnson

Creating positive change and greater work and life fulfillment for both individual leaders and whole organizations is my focus. I have witnessed the most significant shifts when leaders make time to expand their level of awareness, their impact on others, and focus on their strengths, therefore realizing their unique and powerful potential. As the principal of Thinking Partners and a senior associate with a select group of boutique consulting firms, the clients I work with achieve results and change through one-on-one coaching, customized leadership development, values assessments and organizational culture re-engineering.

A Certified Executive Coach (CEC), a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) and a Canadian Human Resource Professional (CHRP), I bring over 20 years experience in progressive people practices, leadership development, organizational culture design and executive coaching. Prior to starting Thinking Partners I worked with Intrawest Corporation, a world leader in resort operations and real estate development with 25,000 employees and volunteers worldwide as a Vice President of People Development. Within my private practice, I have coached business leaders in both the public and private sectors and designed and facilitated multiple leadership development and coaching skills workshops for leaders at all levels.

Crossing over the Bridge (Sixty-Three in Series) Panel Jeane Manning Author and Buddy Boyd Gibsons Recycling Depot “Changing energy and recyclying paradigms”

63stripListen to program. Crossing over the Bridge (Sixty-Three in Series) Panel Jeane Manning Author and Buddy Boyd Gibsons Recycling Depot “Changing energy and recycling paradigms

 

 

jmanning 1When she was born – in Cordova, on Alaska’s pristine Prince William Sound – Jeane’s father was a lawman. Later he moved the family to a farm in northern Idaho, where she continued contemplating nature – and human nature. She earned her way through the University of Idaho and an honors B.A. in Sociology.

Marriage, a job in social work, and three children – Teresa, Jay and Stan – followed. After moving to the Okanagan Valley of western Canada, she parented while writing for newspapers and a regional magazine. She’s also been an editor, counsellor, Big Brothers’ executive director, and publicist for a theater company that traveled in gypsy wagons pulled by Clydesdale horses.

In 1981 Jeane had encountered an electrician who invented a potentially revolutionary magnetic motor/generator. Through him and his wife she met others in the “free-energy underground” from Germany to South Africa, and discovered books about Nikola Tesla and other unsung pioneer inventors.

The implications of their inventions included two of her concerns – ecology and social justice. During the 1980′s, she began researching for a book about this fascinating movement and its people.

While editing a small-town newspaper, Jeane used her vacations to fly to conferences to interview frontier scientists and engineers. German Association for Field Energy, the Swiss Association for Free Energy, Planetary Association for Clean Energy, International Tesla Society, and even a magnet factory hosted them.

In 1989, her birthplace in Alaska was fouled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The horrific news strengthened her resolve to research non-polluting energy sources.

The Explorations program of Canada Council for the Arts in 1994 awarded her book project– then titled Living Energy — enough funding for gasoline and food expenses for a research trip. So that autumn Jeane steered her little Nissan pickup onto cross-country highways to visit inventors and other researchers.

After two months of travel, one morning she awoke – in her sleeping bag in the Nissan’s camper – to a white world outside the window.  The chill she felt, however, had more to do with what she’d learned on the trip than with a Wyoming blizzard.  Her upbringing had not prepared her for the corruption in trusted public servants, and other obstacles, faced by the people she had interviewed.

Much of what she learned during that odyssey, on the other hand, was good news.  She heard that a multilingual architect in Australia was bringing out a book titled Living Energies.  He had masterfully interpreted the works of her favorite energy pioneer, the late Viktor Schauberger of Austria, so she gladly changed her manuscript title from Living Energy.

Eight years earlier in Colorado, she had met the publishers of a magazine entitled Energy Unlimited. The Baumgartners sent her a book, Living Water, introducing Schauberger and his knowledge of engineering in harmony with nature’s creative movements.  Schauberger had pointed out that 20th century technology moves everything the wrong way – exploding, heating, pressuring.  His own inventions used nature’s quiet cooling, inward-spiraling suction motions instead, and the result rejuvenated instead of destroying.

Baumgartners’ next publication, Causes newsletters, furthered Jeane’s understanding of harmonious “implosion technologies”.  Meanwhile, her  own evolving manuscript dealt with a wide range of unusual approaches to generating electricity and their implications for society.

Before her energy book was published (in New York by Avery Publishing Group), the then-editor of Auckland Institute of Technology Press asked Jeane Manning to be a co-author of Suppressed Inventions and Other Discoveries. AIT Press of New Zealand published the book in 1995. (The North American edition was published in 2000 by Avery Publishing Group. Avery was later bought out by Penguin Putnam.)

The Granite Man and the Butterfly: The David Hamel Story, published by Pierre Sinclaire’s Project Magnet, was Jeane’s next writing project.  The sole print run for this small book sold out quickly.

The third diversion from her main project came from meeting Dr. Nick Begich of Anchorage, Alaska.  Another researcher had sent Jeane Manning a large file of science papers related to experiments on Earth’s ionosphere, and to a specific project called the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP).  Dr. Begich had written an article about HAARP for Nexus magazine.  Concerned that such experiments might cause unforseen large-scale effects, both Begich and Manning wanted to see the broader topic brought out into the open, and hoped for an investigation by all independent scientists.

Their co-authored book, Angels Don’t Play This HAARP, was published in 1995 by Earthpulse Press, a company belonging to Dr. Begich and his wife Shelagh. The book sold widely and was translated into Japanese, German, Yugoslavian, and now French. The European Parliament passed a resolution asking for that independent inquiry.

Jeane returned to her main project which was published in 1996 by Avery under the title The Coming Energy Revolution: The Search For Free Energy. In 2002 Penguin Putnam, the publishing giant which took over Avery, took the English version of The Coming Energy Revolution off the market. Jeane reclaimed the rights to the book and is updating it. French and German editions are still available.

Over the years, Jeane wrote articles about frontier science for Explore New Dimensions; Dennis Weaver’s Journal of Ecolonomics; Alive; Shared Vision; Atlantis Rising; Infinite Energy, and other magazines.

Invited to speak at the Institute for New Energy conference in Denver in 1996, she quickly joined a Vancouver Toastmasters’ Club to develop speaking skills. The next podium was, in contrast, an open-air rock concert stage whose audience sprawled on a grassy mountainside. The ski hill venue was organized by young political activists and musicians. Other venues included meeting halls on a sheep ranch in Colorado and in rural B.C., the Planetarium in Vancouver, and a university campus in California.

Further invitations to speak have included a panel at the Women and Sustainable Development conference in Vancouver; the Climates of Change Congress (Victoria 1999); and conferences in Austria, Switzerland and Germany.  She will be speaking at the New Energy Movement public conference in Portland, Oregon, September 25-26, 2004.

One year, Jeane lived in a mountainside log home beyond the power lines in the interior of British Columbia. She emerged from the wilderness only for travels, such as the Innovative Energy Technologies conference in Berlin, where she gave a presentation. Now she’s back in the southern part of the Okanagan valley. Her royalties from books were plowed back into research travel, computers, and further educating herself.

Recently, she reconnected with William Baumgartner and his wife. He and Jeane began a book about his extensive knowledge and experiments he’s conducted over a 30 year span. It’s an opportunity to write about engineering in harmony with nature, and she’s enthused.  However, her need for an income has postponed the project until the current book is published. It was delayed by the same reason – the necessity for her to do freelance writing for business publications.

Her motivations for the energy odyssey began with her children and now include the newest generation: Travis, Nicholas and Sarah.  “I simply want my children, grandchildren, and all of Earth’s offspring to breathe clean air, on a rejuvenated planet.”

Jeane sees hope in grassroots campaigns such as the New Energy Movement, which recognizes the need for personal responsibility, sensible economics, wise governance and sustainable agriculture, as well as clean water, oxygen-rich air and ample non-polluting energy.

Her challenge is to put the issues into plain language, in books full of compelling, true stories. You take it from there

bb1Buddy Boyd and his partner Barb Hetherington spend every day of their lives trying to better their community and their environment. There aren’t many people who can say that they wake up in the morning with the one goal: to improve the world around them. And for that reason that Buddy and Barb were recognized with the Best Green Business Award from Small Business BC for the work they do through their small business Gibsons Recycling Depot. Gibsons Recycling Depot is so much more than a privately-owned recycling facility on the Sunshine Coast – it‘s a small business with the big goal of making a difference by promoting sustainability, while also creating employment opportunities in the local community.

bb6The Gibsons Recycling Depot site receives delegations that include elected officials (both from Canada and abroad) and conducts other site visits. Over the past year the company also collaborated with a local sustainability company called Greenomics to form a unique consulting group to help other communities with their recycling efforts, including a community in Africa.

Gibsons Recycling Depot was recognized as the Best Green Business at the 10th Annual Successful You Awards on February 28, 2013. Buddy and Barb believe that the award is a great opportunity to raise the profile of their work as environmentalists and showcase the solutions the business provides as a Zero Waste advocate. Barb and Buddy are also involved with starting up Zero Waste Canada nationally.

But the recognition is secondary. “Awards and accolades are meaningless if we aren’t actually doing something – making a difference,” says Buddy. “We are proactive and encourage everyone to do the same. Rather than follow, we choose to lead.”

“There may be some grand, sacrificial, heroic answers, but the best answers I know are almost trivial. Environmental problems are caused by billions of small, unthinking actions. They will be cured by billions of small, sensible actions, simple substitutions of environmentally conscious habits for the old thoughtless and wasteful ones”. — Anonymous

March 31, 2013 “The Recycling Paradigm” Crossing over the Bridge (Fifty Nine in Series)

Listen to Program.

033113BRIDGE59Crossing over the Bridge (59) “The Recycling Paradigm” Panel: Buddy Boyd Founder Gibsons Recycling Depot Vancouver Canada, Jeffrey Morris Economist Sound Resource Management Group, Paul Connett Ph.D Professor of Chemistry St. Lawrence University, Erich Schwartz Consultant Greenomics

bb1Buddy Boyd and his partner Barb Hetherington spend every day of their lives trying to better their community and their environment. There aren’t many people who can say that they wake up in the morning with the one goal: to improve the world around them. And for that reason that Buddy and Barb were recognized with the Best Green Business Award from Small Business BC for the work they do through their small business Gibsons Recycling Depot. Gibsons Recycling Depot is so much more than a privately owned recycling facility on the Sunshine Coast – it‘s a small business with the big goal of making a difference by promoting sustainability, while also creating employment opportunities in the local community.

Owner Buddy Boyd’s passion for the environment stems from over four decades of entrepreneurial experience. As a teenager on the streets with little education or focus, he was selected for the Bank of Montreal Youth Project – a program geared toward helping youth build self-esteem and find their passion. “This one thing changed the course of my life,” says Buddy. “Each student was required to develop their own individual presentation on something that we cared deeply about. I formed a chapter of STOP (Society to Overcome Pollution).”

Jeffrey Morris – Current research and consulting interests – Economic cost/benefit valuation of pollutant emissions, life cycle assessment emissions impact categories (e.g., global warming, acidification, eutrophication, criteria air pollutants,
human toxicity and ecological toxicity), natural capital, and nonmarket services (e.g., litter control, graffiti control, illegal dumping cleanup, watershed ecological management, and recycling) that often are bundled with traditional market-based services such as water supply, wastewater management, and garbage collection. Particular expertise and interest in accounting for externalities and nonmarket products & services in decision-making.

Clients include the US Department of Justice, Washington State Department of Ecology, Washington State Clean Washington Center, Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, Seattle Public Utilities, New York City, San Francisco, Toronto, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Tacoma (WA), Bellevue (WA), King County (WA) Department of Natural Resources, San Luis Obispo County (CA) Integrated Waste Management Authority, Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group, Rhode Island Clean Water Fund, Pollution Probe (Toronto), and New Jersey Environmental Federation.

connett1Professor of Chemistry Paul Connett’s environmental activism goes beyond his classes. Investigations into the scientific evidence against the practice of water fluoridation has become a family affair for the Connett household. His son Michael ’99 is the research director and Webmaster for the Fluoride Action Network (http://www.fluoridealert.org), and his wife, Ellen, is also involved in researching the topic. All three presented scientific papers at the 26th Conference of the International Society for Fluoride Research, held in Wiesbaden, Germany, recently. Paul Connett has received numerous awards and citations for his work, and frequently participates in community discussions on fluoridation. A graduate of Cambridge University, Connett holds a Ph.D. from Dartmouth College and joined the faculty at St. Lawrence in 1983. Connett’s opposition to incineration as a method of managing solid waste, based on his chemical analysis of the byproducts of the process, has taken him to 49 states, five Canadian provinces and 44 other countries. He has given over 1,700 public presentations, written many articles on dioxin and waste management and co-produced several videotapes on those topics, as a result of that research. Connett says that he has devoted a great deal of time and effort to grass-roots environmental organizations during his career, because “that is the place where we can effect genuine change.”

erich1Erich Schwartz is a consultant and entrepreneur focused in developing and implementing strategic plans and solutions for a variety of organizations globally and across industries. Specifically, he has been highly successful with sustainability programs, large-scale information and educational technology projects, and telecommunications infrastructure integration projects for Fortune 500, Crown Corporations, Governments, and mid-size businesses throughout the world. Erich is an experienced leader, working with business, government, and community stakeholders to develop long-term strategies and influence policy. He has managed globally distributed teams of professionals across functions, including hardware and software engineering, program and project management, training, communications and marketing, and business owners. Working with these teams Erich has been able to successfully conceive, design, implement, and transition projects while meeting quality, time and budget requirements. Over the last few years, Erich combined the breadth and depth of his business experience with a life-long passion for a sustainable environment by establishing and running Greenomics Corporation, a consultancy that combines business, education, and community leadership to help transition businesses and communities to sustainable practices while maintaining or increasing profitability.

trashedposterTrashed The Movie

“Trashed” is a provocative investigation of one of the fastest growing industries in North America. The garbage business. The film examines a fundamental element of modern American culture…the disposal of what our society defines as “waste.” It is an issue influenced by every American, most of whom never consider the consequences. Nor, it seems, the implications to our biosphere. At times humorous, but deeply poignant, “Trashed” examines the American waste stream fast approaching a half billion tons annually.

What are the effects all this waste will have on already strained natural resources? Why is so much of it produced? While every American creates almost 5 pounds of it every day, who is affected most? And who wants America to make more?

The film analyzes the causes and effects of the seemingly innocuous act of “taking out the garbage” while showcasing the individuals, activists, corporate and advocacy groups working to affect change and reform the current model. “Trashed” is an informative and thought-provoking film everyone interested in the future of sustainability should see.

March 18, 2013 Buddy Boyd Gibsons Recycling Depot Vancouver Canada “

bb1Listen to Program. March 18, 2013. Buddy Boyd and his partner Barb Hetherington spend every day of their lives trying to better their community and their environment. There aren’t many people who can say that they wake up in the morning with the one goal: to improve the world around them. And for that reason that Buddy and Barb were recognized with the Best Green Business Award from Small Business BC for the work they do through their small business Gibsons Recycling Depot.

Gibsons Recycling Depot is so much more than a privately-owned recycling facility on the Sunshine Coast – it‘s a small business with the big goal of making a difference by promoting sustainability, while also creating employment opportunities in the local community.

Owner Buddy Boyd’s passion for the environment stems from over four decades of entrepreneurial experience. As a teenager on the streets with little education or focus, he was selected for the Bank of Montreal Youth Project – a program geared toward helping youth build self-esteem and find their passion. “This one thing changed the course of my life,” says Buddy. “Each student was required to develop their own individual presentation on something that we cared deeply about. I formed a chapter of STOP (Society to Overcome Pollution).”

From Campus Clean-up Champion to a Record Store Owner to a Sawmill Operator

A few years later while attending Montreal’s Dawson College, Buddy formed the “Tidy Tim” group to help clean-up and promote recycling on campus. Subsequently, while working for a disposal company in the early 1980s he opened a record store called Breeze Records in Vancouver on Denman Street, which in 1985 became the “Official Supplier of Music” for the Rick Hanson Man in Motion Around the World Tour, and raised over $4,000 for spinal cord research through a benefit dance.

Around that same time, Buddy also started a portable sawmill business sawing trees on people’s properties so they could build homes using lumber products from their own land. As this business picked up, Buddy eventually sold the record store and used the profits to buy a new sawmill.

A Small Business with a Big Impact

Next on Buddy’s entrepreneurial journey came Gibsons. In 2001, he started a small disposal company called Gibsons Disposal Ltd. After developing a loyal customer base for two years, Buddy and his partner Barb Hetherington opened Gibsons Recycling Depot in 2003 – a privately-owned recycling operation that was one of the first Resource Recovery facilities in BC.

Now employing seventeen staff members, Gibsons Recycling Depot has had huge impact on the “water access only” community that it serves. The company diverts a significant amount of waste from landfills, and creates much needed employment opportunities in the area. Its well-established Zero Waste Reuse Store – Buddy and Barb’s “One-Stop-Drop” – also supplies reused items to local residents and non-profits.

What truly characterizes Gibsons Recycling Depot is its commitment to crafting and implementing innovative solutions to waste reduction. The company was the first in BC to deconstruct children’s car seats, and also started a comprehensive local glass recycling program as an Earth Day project. As a result, previously landfilled glass is now turned into an aggregate. Today, Gibsons Recycling Depot supplies its recycled glass product to landscapers, concrete companies, local artisans and glass blowers.

Sustainable, Through and Through

More than just diverting waste from landfills and incinerators, environmental sustainability is baked right into Gibsons Recycling Depot’s business process. “Our corporate position is wherever and whenever possible, we use recycled, up-cycled or re-purposed materials,” says Buddy.

The company’s open-air facility was designed for natural light, and uses only energy-efficient CFLs and LED lights where absolutely necessary. The facility itself is made up of repurposed shipping containers and recycled building materials. Gibsons Recycling Depot also launched the first curbside recycling service in North America that uses electric vehicles. This spring, the company will add a large array of solar panels to help offset the cost of operating its fleet of electric vehicles.

A Model for Others

The Gibsons Recycling Depot site receives delegations that include elected officials (both from Canada and abroad) and conducts other site visits. Over the past year the company also collaborated with a local sustainability company called Greenomics to form a unique consulting group to help other communities with their recycling efforts, including a community in Africa.

Gibsons Recycling Depot was recognized as the Best Green Business at the 10th Annual Successful You Awards on February 28, 2013. Buddy and Barb believe that the award is a great opportunity to raise the profile of their work as environmentalists and showcase the solutions the business provides as a Zero Waste advocate.

But the recognition is secondary. “Awards and accolades are meaningless if we aren’t actually doing something – making a difference,” says Buddy. “We are proactive and encourage everyone to do the same. Rather than follow, we choose to lead.”

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