Posts Tagged ‘ change ’

18 March, 2015 A whole of community approach in Cunnamulla

Whole of Community Change – Annalise Jennings

A whole of community approach in Cunnamulla

(F) Annalise Jennings Dynamic Exchange, (L-R) Kerry Crumblin CEO CACH, Julie Fox Cunnamulla State School, Lindsay Godfrey Paroo Shire Mayor, Nicole Gibson National Mental Health Commissioner, Lawrence 'Cheesie' Anderson Cunnamulla Disability Services.

(F) Annalise Jennings Dynamic Exchange,
(L-R) Kerry Crumblin CEO CACH, Julie Fox Cunnamulla State School, Lindsay Godfrey Paroo Shire Mayor, Nicole Gibson National Mental Health Commissioner, Lawrence ‘Cheesie’ Anderson Cunnamulla Disability Services.

Cunnamulla residents today took the first steps in identifying core community values to create a community owned vision and blueprint for the future.

The meeting follows initial roundtable discussions in March where the Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health (CACH), Paroo Shire Council, South West Hospital and Health Service (HHS), Murweh Shire Council and Central and Western Areas Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health (CWAATSICH) were given a mandate to progress strategies to improve social and health outcomes for the communities.

image001Annalise Jennings from Dynamic Exchange was brought in to facilitate the meeting based on her wealth of experience in helping communities drive positive change.

“‘Whole of Community Change’ is a philosophy of ownership and self- determination,” she said.

“It’s about the push for change coming from the community who live and work here, rather than being imposed by policy makers from afar.”

Ms Jennings’ work in Cape York has seen the Napranum community shift from welfare dependency to wealth creation.

“In Napranum within two years there was a 60 per cent increase in employment and a 40 per cent increase in community owned infrastructure.”

Ms Jennings said it is all about shifting the conversation from discussing problems to creating possibilities.

“Our communities are not a problem to be solved.”

“They are full of opportunity and potential that we need to collectively recognise and support.”

“Creating a connected community is about respecting our differences and finding our common goals and values.

aj2Ms Jennings said the ‘Whole of Community Change’ framework opens the door for the community to create a vision and to be supported in making it a reality by service providers and policy makers.”

Press Release HOPE MEDIA RELEASE – A whole of Community approach in Cunnamulla 150518 fc courtesy HOPE Harmony, Opportunity, Pride, Empowerment – Australia

Cunnamulla Landscape 2015

Allan Tannock Weir in Cunnamulla Cunnamulla Landscape Courtesy AJ 2015

October 7, 2014 Episode Three in the series Whole of Community Change Annalise Jennings Director Dynamic Exchange, Ms. Maryann Coconut Elder and Representative, Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council, Angie Lui & Dicky Namai

Featuring in episode three of a new long-term series Whole of Community Change Annalise Jennings Director Dynamic Exchange, Ms. Maryann Coconut Elder and Representative, Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council, Angie Lui President of the Napranum Events Committee and Dicky Namai Supervisor of the Napranum Housing Unit

Listen/view to broadcast

Annalise Jennings

aj3Annalise as the director of Dynamic Exchange has over 25 years experience in senior roles in financial services and other sectors including property and small business. Annalise is an experienced facilitator and has led business transformation in project management in large organisations and has an extensive background in risk management and organisational culture. This experience has been gained through working in India, Australia & New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Annalise has spoken on transformation and maximising human potential in a variety of business and community forums.

Annalise is passionate about teams and helping them discover healthy working relationships and celebrating success and empowerment. Annalise balances her time between key corporate engagements, her part-time career as an alternative health practitioner and has always combined her working life with parenting and study. She strongly believes in human potential and is a passionate advocate of ethical corporate and individual behaviour in the business community.

Annalise’s qualifications include a post-graduate diploma in project management. She is affiliated with the Risk Management Association of Australia and is a member of the International Association of Counsellors and Therapists.

Dynamic Exchange is the trusted partner in business and community transformation. Our mission is to support individuals, teams and communities to reach their fullest potential through discovering healthy working relationships and celebrating success and empowerment.

We believe in human potential and we are passionate advocates of ethical, corporate and individual behaviour in communities and in business.

Dynamic Exchange helps individuals and communities to:

Balance financial security

Build harmonious relationships

Build a sense of self-worth through a positive self-image

Set the agenda for change and maturity through a mindset of accountability and ownership

Develop a sense of community spirit through shared vision and an infrastructure that supports future growth

Build alliances with others by sharing solutions and partnering for joint projects

Build a legacy for future generations. Be recognised as market leaders

Napranum

aj9Napranum (meaning meeting place of the people) was the site of Weipa Presbyterian Mission from 1932 to 1965. Before 1932, the original Weipa Mission was situated near Spring Creek on the upper northern reaches of the Embley River. On 1 February 1966, the church handed over control to the Queensland Government and the mission became known as Weipa South settlement. During the late 1960s the name Napranum was increasingly used by the community.

At least twelve traditional owner groups occupied the surrounding lands, however there are families living at Napranum today whose links extend to Mapoon in the north and Aurukun in the south. For example, the Thaynakwith people who have traditional links to the Andoom and Pine River area settled at both Mapoon and Weipa during the missionary period.

Additionally some people from as far away as the Ducie River and near Moreton and Mein telegraph stations came in to live at Weipa in the early 1900s. In his annual report for 1901, the Northern Protector of Aboriginals, W.E. Roth, wrote that the ‘sphere of influence of the Weipa Mission which I visited last May is gradually though slowly extending, blacks coming in now not only from Pera Head, and the upper reaches of the Batavia and Ducie Rivers, but also (a few) from the mouth of the Archer, from the Moreton [telegraph station], and from the area intermediate between Coen and Mein’.

During the 1960s people from other Aboriginal communities and the Torres Strait Islands settled at Napranum in search of work. Today about 1000 people live at Napranum.

Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council

Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council is the local authority for the Napranum community and Napranum Deed of Grant in Trust (DOGIT) lands. Its Mayor and Councillors are elected every four years. Community administration is provided by Council staff led by a Chief Executive Officer. The Council is the trustee for the Napranum DOGIT lands.

Napranum residents are employed in a wide range of community work, land and sea management, local contracting firms and mining operations.

Maryann Coconut: Community Elder and Traditional Owner. Chairperson of the Indigenous Justice Group

aj7As Councillor of the Napranum Aboriginal community, Maryann’s responsibilities include education and social services. Maryann believes education is essential to community progress. She has led the way completing a Bachelor of Community Management at Maquarie University NS.

Maryann also believes we, the people are the Caretakers of this Land; given to us by the Creator Spirit who is the Creator. We acknowledge Him with adoration and thanksgiving. We the Elders are the Gate Keepers. This is an age-old role given to us by our Ancestors. Our knowledge and wisdom of our country is still strong; and will remain invisible and well guarded in our spirit till we die. Our spirit will pass this knowledge on to the next Elder in line.

Dicky Namai Supervisor of the Napranum Housing Unit

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADicky Namai is a qualified carpenter tradesman and Supervisor of the Napranum Housing Unit. He participated in the Napranum Leaders Collaboration Program when the community’s blue print was 1st created (Nov ’11). He also participated in the Men of Worth program. (April ’13) Namai is married to Ramona and a father of 3 boys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angela Lui

alwcc1Angela Lui is a Senior Sport and Recreation Officer and President of the Napranum Events Committee. He is also the President of the Senior’s Rugby League Club and has a passion for community development, socio-economic development and self worth for community people. Angela also strives to build capcity in personal behaviour.

September 16, 2014 Episode I in series Whole of Community Change Annalise Jennings Director Dynamic Exchange, Ms. Maryann Coconut Elder and Representative, Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council and Bo Wagata Former Deputy Mayor of Napranum

September 16, 2014 Featuring in a new long-term series Whole of Community Change Annalise Jennings Director Dynamic Exchange and Ms. Maryann Coconut Elder and Representative, Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council and Bo Wagata Former Deputy Mayor of Napranum.

Listen/view to broadcast

Annalise Jennings

aj3Annalise as the director of Dynamic Exchange has over 25 years experience in senior roles in financial services and other sectors including property and small business. Annalise is an experienced facilitator and has led business transformation in project management in large organisations and has an extensive background in risk management and organisational culture. This experience has been gained through working in India, Australia & New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Annalise has spoken on transformation and maximising human potential in a variety of business and community forums.

Annalise is passionate about teams and helping them discover healthy working relationships and celebrating success and empowerment. Annalise balances her time between key corporate engagements, her part-time career as an alternative health practitioner and has always combined her working life with parenting and study. She strongly believes in human potential and is a passionate advocate of ethical corporate and individual behaviour in the business community.

Annalise’s qualifications include a post-graduate diploma in project management. She is affiliated with the Risk Management Association of Australia and is a member of the International Association of Counsellors and Therapists.

aj1Dynamic Exchange is the trusted partner in business and community transformation. Our mission is to support individuals, teams and communities to reach their fullest potential through discovering healthy working relationships and celebrating success and empowerment.

We believe in human potential and we are passionate advocates of ethical, corporate and individual behaviour in communities and in business.

Dynamic Exchange helps individuals and communities to:

  • Balance financial security
  • Build harmonious relationships
  • Build a sense of self-worth through a positive self-image
  • Set the agenda for change and maturity through a mindset of accountability and ownership
  • Develop a sense of community spirit through shared vision and an infrastructure that supports future growth
  • Build alliances with others by sharing solutions and partnering for joint projects
  • Build a legacy for future generations. Be recognised as market leaders

 

 

Napranum

aj9Napranum (meaning meeting place of the people) was the site of Weipa Presbyterian Mission from 1932 to 1965. Before 1932, the original Weipa Mission was situated near Spring Creek on the upper northern reaches of the Embley River. On 1 February 1966, the church handed over control to the Queensland Government and the mission became known as Weipa South settlement. During the late 1960s the name Napranum was increasingly used by the community.

At least twelve traditional owner groups occupied the surrounding lands, however there are families living at Napranum today whose links extend to Mapoon in the north and Aurukun in the south. For example, the Thaynakwith people who have traditional links to the Andoom and Pine River area settled at both Mapoon and Weipa during the missionary period.

Additionally some people from as far away as the Ducie River and near Moreton and Mein telegraph stations came in to live at Weipa in the early 1900s. In his annual report for 1901, the Northern Protector of Aboriginals, W.E. Roth, wrote that the ‘sphere of influence of the Weipa Mission which I visited last May is gradually though slowly extending, blacks coming in now not only from Pera Head, and the upper reaches of the Batavia and Ducie Rivers, but also (a few) from the mouth of the Archer, from the Moreton [telegraph station], and from the area intermediate between Coen and Mein’.

During the 1960s people from other Aboriginal communities and the Torres Strait Islands settled at Napranum in search of work. Today about 1000 people live at Napranum.

Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council

Napranum Aboriginal Shire Council is the local authority for the Napranum community and Napranum Deed of Grant in Trust (DOGIT) lands. Its Mayor and Councillors are elected every four years. Community administration is provided by Council staff led by a Chief Executive Officer. The Council is the trustee for the Napranum DOGIT lands.

Napranum residents are employed in a wide range of community work, land and sea management, local contracting firms and mining operations.

Maryann Coconut: Community Elder and Traditional Owner. Chairperson of the Indigenous Justice Group

maa1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Councillor of the Napranum Aboriginal community, Maryann’s responsibilities include education and social services. Maryann believes education is essential to community progress. She has led the way completing a Bachelor of Community Management at Maquarie University NS.

Maryann also believes we, the people are the Caretakers of this Land; given to us by the Creator Spirit who is the Creator. We acknowledge Him with adoration and thanksgiving. We the Elders are the Gate Keepers. This is an age-old role given to us by our Ancestors. Our knowledge and wisdom of our country is still strong; and will remain invisible and well guarded in our spirit till we die. Our spirit will pass this knowledge on to the next Elder in line.

April 15, 2013 Crossing over the Bridge (60) “The Creation of Social Capital & Creative Entrepreneurs”

Listen to Program. Crossing over the Bridge (60) “The Creation of Social Capital & Creative Entrepreneurs” Panel: Rachel Gilkes Founder Chutney for Change – Former Member of the Royal household & Student BA (Hons) Social Science at the College’s University Centre & Dr. Craig A. Hammond Lecturer University Center Blackburn College, England, United Kingdom.

rg1bRachel Gilkes a former member of the Royal household has been crowned National Student Entrepreneur of the Year by student TV programme, ‘The Grad Factor’. University Centre at Blackburn College student Rachel Gilkes, 37, who is currently studying BA (Hons) Social Science at the College’s University Centre which is validated by Lancaster University, scooped the prestigious award at the Google campus in London for her social enterprise idea ‘Chutney for Change.’ The project involves engaging disadvantaged people from the community to create chutneys, jams and preserves from the surplus fruit and vegetables donated by growers, markets and national retailers. The company has already had interest from a national supermarket chain, which is keen to sell the chutneys in its stores. Mum of two Rachel was previously part of the catering staff at Buckingham Palace, before going on to set up her own restaurant business.

More recently, she launched a company that specialises in making homemade breads and cakes. Rachel says:  “The idea came about when a local commmunity centre’s transport was cut. “I started to think of a social enterprise project where we could make something collectively to sell and it all spiraled from there.  Essentially it’s a community project where the people making the chutneys will get training and a new set of skills, and the people buying the product will be directly contributing to the local economy and society by potentially changing these peoples’ lives.

“I’m really pleased I won National Student Entrepreneur of the Year, and the money I won will be ploughed straight into the business. I really believe social enterprise is the future for the growth of our country, so that’s why I decided to go back to education to study a degree which encompassed all the disciplines of social science.  We need to start giving back to our communities, so if you want to get involved then please get in touch.”

Born into an archetypal working-class family in Blackburn, Lancashire, UK, and, growing-up in an environment of ‘Working Men’s’ Clubs, 2nd Division football, and, eventually, Manchester-based ‘indie’ music and associated local gangs, Hammond fared abysmally at school. With little other option, at the age of 16 he joined the Army – the Life Guards (as part of the Household Cavalry Ceremonial Mounted Division). Hammond can look back now, and, meditate with the safe distance of hindsight, (but not regret), upon the dark times that followed him into the brief stint as a teenage soldier; and, beyond this, working on rotating 3-shifts as a weaver in a local textile mill, until his early 20’s. Fascinated with film, he harboured an undisclosable ache. He was a dreamer, a day-dreamer, an introspective and sensitive thinker, and nothing at school, or indeed, his immediate environment provided a creative or productive outlet for these secret and expectant day-dreams and aspirations for adventure, exploration, and possibility. He wasn’t much of a reader either, but could always make time for The Magic Faraway Tree, fairytales, and, later, Tolkien’s The Hobbit.

ch1Dr. Craig Hammond. His working class life had been pretty much mapped, that was his lot, and therefore, was expected to get on with it (and he did, without really thinking about it).  But, in his secret inner world, he still had dreams, romance, and aspiration in his filmic and creative inner-world escapes. As part of the strident and aggressive ascendency of his working-class youth, Rocky, First Blood, and Warriors were all to be added to his filmic-escapology, alongside the reflectively spatial The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy, and Elephant Man. Whether real or not, a filmic gap then appears to traverse his late teens and early twenties – until Shirley Valentine pierces through, and in, to his world of frustrated and disappointed hopes; this was followed by a very public catharsis in response to his first viewing of The Shawshank Redemption. Alongside subsequent revisitations of Watership Down he started to remember; a sense that something had been abandoned somewhere, a once aspirant adventurer, a dreamer, who believed in possibility, and, the transformative and creative power of certain ideas.

He was never much of a philosopher – that came much later – but through the redemptive metaphors, nostalgic traces and, cathartic encounters embedded within these popular films, his life journey was to become strangely and bespokenly signposted. More than this, these films have in some way sporadically guided and empowered him, over many years, against often brutalist and overwhelming odds to dream, remember, hope – and ultimately (eventually) dare to stretch and reach-out towards something potentially better.

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