The Reading Room – July 2014

julycalimageThe Reading Room – July 2014

 

 

 

 

RRPICThis month in the reading room recommended books are listed below and at the official website. Visit

 

 

 

 

 

 

gleth0714Lethbridge, Thomas Charles British Author, Archaeologist and Physic Researcher (1901 – 1971) who was committed to investigating occult subjects, such as dowsing, ghosts, witchcraft, etc in a scientific manner. “In this book T. C. Lethbridge writes about the excavation of a forgotten Neolithic chalk figure in the Cambridgeshire hills. He details the clues available and shows how they were followed up, and tells how the search ended in the apparent discovery of two other giant figures as well. The greater part of the book is devoted to a search into the meanings of these figures. Based on archaeological, historical and biblical information as well as folklore, his findings not only indicate the survival of an ancient religion but direct valuable light on the nature of the old gods themselves.”

 

 

 

rrsh0714-1Sheldrake, Rupert P.h.D. Author and Biologist has written more than 80 scientific papers and ten books. He was among the top 100 Global Thought Leaders for 2013, as ranked by the Duttweiler Institute, Zurich, Switzerland’s leading think tank. He studied natural sciences at Cambridge University, where he was a Scholar of Clare College, took a double first class honours degree and was awarded the University Botany Prize (1963). He then studied philosophy and history of science at Harvard University, where he was a Frank Knox Fellow (1963-64), before returning to Cambridge, where he took a Ph.D. in biochemistry (1967). He was a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge (1967-73), where he was Director of Studies in biochemistry and cell biology. As the Rosenheim Research Fellow of the Royal Society (1970-73), he carried out research on the development of plants and the ageing of cells in the Department of Biochemistry at Cambridge University. While at Cambridge, together with Philip Rubery, he discovered the mechanism of polar auxin transport, the process by which the plant hormone auxin is carried from the shoots towards the roots. From 1968 to 1969, as a Royal Society Leverhulme Scholar, based in the Botany Department of the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, he studied rain forest plants. From 1974 to 1985 he was Principal Plant Physiologist and Consultant Physiologist at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) in Hyderabad, India, where he helped develop new cropping systems now widely used by farmers.

While in India, he also lived for a year and a half at the ashram of Fr Bede Griffiths in Tamil Nadu, where he wrote his first book, A New Science of Life, published in 1981 (new edition 2009). Why do many phenomena defy the explanations of conventional biology and physics? For instance, when laboratory rats in one place have learned how to navigate a new maze, why do rats elsewhere in the world seem to learn it more easily? Rupert Sheldrake describes this process as morphic resonance: the past forms and behaviors of organisms, he argues, influence organisms in the present through direct connections across time and space. Calling into question many of our fundamental concepts about life and consciousness, Sheldrake reinterprets the regularities of nature as being more like habits than immutable laws.

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